• What Causes Dyslexia? An Overview of 5 Theories

    What Causes Dyslexia? An Overview of 5 Theories

    As you may know, dyslexia is a learning disability that causes reading and language difficulties. These difficulties are the result of the way the dyslexic brain processes graphic symbols (letters) in connection to their sounds (phonemes) in a given language.

    Although many of the symptoms of dyslexia have been discovered, it still remains unclear what causes dyslexia. However, there are several theories which help explain the origin of this condition. Most researchers believe dyslexia is caused by a combination of these theories, but the exact combination or specific cause is yet to be discovered. ...

    Read More

    Oct 04 2010
  • Biography on Education Writer, Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Biography on Education Writer, Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Here is a bio on Dr. Monica Bomengen, writer of many of our recent blog posts.

    I became a teacher in 1985 via alternative certification. My teaching career took me from suburban Atlanta to a rural community college in western North Carolina to the newly urbanized mill towns of central Massachusetts, and to every grade level from seventh through college undergraduate. ...

    Read More

    Sep 30 2010
  • What is Phonics?

    What is Phonics?

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Parents of elementary students hear the term “phonics” and may have questions about the meaning of this reading instructional method and the terminology that accompanies it. It is helpful for parents to know the basics of what phonics means in order to understand the method(s) used to teach their child to read. ...

    Read More

    Sep 27 2010
  • What is the “Whole Language” Approach to Teaching Reading?

    What is the “Whole Language” Approach to Teaching Reading?

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Definition of the Whole Language Approach

    In the simplest terms, the “whole language approach” is a method of teaching children to read by recognizing words as whole pieces of language. Proponents of the whole language philosophy believe that language should not be broken down into letters and combinations of letters and “decoded.” Instead, they believe that language is a complete system of making meaning, with words functioning in relation to each other in context. ...

    Read More

    Sep 23 2010
  • Building Reading Comprehension through Questioning Techniques

    Building Reading Comprehension through Questioning Techniques

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Strong readers practice active reading, meaning, the reader uses strategies to make himself think and naturally decodes written words. Active reading strategies make it more likely that a student will understand a text.

    Active Reading Strategies

    There are six strategies commonly associated with active reading: ...

    Read More

    Sep 20 2010
  • ESL Teaching Strategies: Improving Vocabulary Improves Reading Fluency

    ESL Teaching Strategies: Improving Vocabulary Improves Reading Fluency

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Nonnative speakers of English who are in the English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom face struggles with reading in English even if they are already strong readers in their native language. The natural tendency is for the reader to translate the words into the native language in his head as he reads. This practice slows the reader down and keeps the focus on individual words as opposed to overall meaning of the text. The reader becomes preoccupied with decoding and translation, losing all but the most rudimentary reading comprehension, requiring re-reading and slowing the whole process down considerably. ...

    Read More

    Sep 16 2010
  • 5 Elements of Effective Reading Instruction

    5 Elements of Effective Reading Instruction

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    One outcome of the “reading wars” between the phonics and whole language advocates was the tremendous growth of research in the area of teaching young children how to read English. Congress created the National Reading Panel (NRP) and charged it with the task of evaluating different approaches used to teach children to read and assessing the effectiveness of each. The NRP was an outgrowth of the National Institutes of Health.

    The NRP issued a report in April 2000 called Teaching Children to Read. In the report, the NRP presented a summary of the research in eight areas of reading instruction and literacy, which have been called the five dimensions of reading: ...

    Read More

    Sep 13 2010
  • 12 Terms Every Reading Teacher Should Know

    12 Terms Every Reading Teacher Should Know

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Reading is not a skill that comes naturally. Even highly skilled readers had to be taught at some point. If reading came naturally, like speaking, most children would arrive at school already reading at a reasonable skill level. Simply showing a child a book does not teach him to read. Reading requires explicit and systematic instruction. For many children, the skills required to read must be broken down into smaller steps and practiced one at a time. For this reason, it is essential that reading teachers be thoroughly prepared and knowledgeable in their field. The following list includes terms commonly used when discussing teaching reading and struggling readers: ...

    Read More

    Sep 09 2010
  • Reading Wars: Phonics vs. Whole Language Reading Instruction

    Reading Wars: Phonics vs. Whole Language Reading Instruction

    By: Dr. Monica Bomengen

    Parents of young readers might be confused when hearing about the “reading wars” over how best to teach children to read. Since the 1980s, there has been a conflict between proponents of phonics-based reading instruction and those who favor the whole-language approach. Here's what you need to know to find peace in the war...

    Read More

    Sep 07 2010

Email Subscribe

Featured Posts

Blog Authors

back to top