March 12, 2019

Reading Horizons ESSA Documentation and Research

The Reading Horizons ESSA documentation is contained herein. Please review the documents for approval in individual states.

 ESSA

The research below is data that corresponds to Tier 3 ESSA documentation for review and approval in individual states. See both studies below.

What is ESSA and Tier 3? 

ESSA is the Every Student Succeeds ACT passed in December of 2015.

"Many ESSA programs encourage state educational agencies (SEAs), local educational agencies (LEAs), and schools to prioritize and include evidence-based interventions, strategies, or approaches.

Evidence-based interventions are practices or programs that have evidence to show that they are effective at producing results and improving outcomes when implemented. The kind of evidence described in ESSA has generally been produced through formal studies and research.

Evidence-based interventions are practices or programs that have evidence to show that they are effective at producing results and improving outcomes when implemented. The kind of evidence described in ESSA has generally been produced through formal studies and research."

What is Tier 3?

Tier 3 – Promising Evidence is:

  • Supported by one or more well-designed and well-implemented correlational studies including data collection and analyses (with statistical controls for selection bias).
  • A correlational study  - which is a formal study (as opposed to an experiment) that was conducted to determine if a relationship exists between an intervention and a given outcome (commonly done through data collection and analysis).
  • The intervention showed a statistically significant and positive effect on the outcome.

The information above is referenced in the following website: https://www.cde.ca.gov/re/es/evidence.asp

ESSA Studies: Research and documentation from Reading Horizons that meets the standards outlined in ESSA for Tier 3:


Study #1: Grades K-3 Mainstream - Iron Springs Study

Download 1-Page Summary: Study #1 Iron Springs ESSA Documentation

Download 8-Page Summary: Study #1 Iron Springs ESSA Documentation

Download Complete Documentation: Study #1 Iron Springs ESSA Documentation

Study #1 Research Overview (of study used in ESSA documentation):

Summary of Findings

Students who received Reading Horizons instruction scored higher as a group on both criterion-referenced tests and norm-referenced tests than did students at a comparison school who did not receive Reading Horizons instruction. Additionally, teacher and student surveys showed positive attitudes about Reading Horizons use.

Background

The state office of education tasked an independent research firm to investigate the impact of Reading Horizons implementation on the reading outcomes of elementary students.

Resources

  • Reading Horizons Discovery® direct instruction materials
  • Reading Horizons Discovery® interactive software
  • Teachers trained in the Reading Horizons® method
  • A school-wide educator mentor with specialization in reading instruction

Implementation

Kindergarten through third-grade teachers participated in training in the Reading Horizons® method. Student achievement outcome data were gathered via multiple assessments (criterion-referenced and norm-referenced) and were compared with data from a control school similar in socioeconomic status and in suburban extent. Teachers and students also participated in surveys and interviews.


Study #2: Grades 6-8 Intervention - Bailey Middle School

Download 1-Page Summary: Study #2 Bailey Middle School ESSA Documentation

Download Complete Documentation: Study #2 Bailey Middle School ESSA Documentation

Study #2 Research Overview (of study used in ESSA documentation):

Summary of Findings

Following Reading Horizons instruction, underperforming middle school students improved reading skills as measured by nationally normed tests.

Background

A middle school resource teacher implemented the Reading Horizons program with 185 students. Pre- and post-test scores for all of the students were gathered before and after the students had used the Reading Horizons interactive software.

Resources

  • Reading Horizons Elevate® software
  • Reading Horizons Elevate® direct instruction materials
  • Multiple assessments
  • A teacher trained in the Reading Horizons® method

Implementation

Bailey Middle School used multiple assessments, such as KPREP, Discovery Education, and MAP, to identify at-risk students. It began using Reading Horizons as an intervention for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students in the bottom 10th percentile. The students used the program daily and stayed in the program until they tested above the 10th percentile or tested out of the program.

Outcome data was recorded for 185 students who received Reading Horizons instruction during their 6th, 7th, or 8th grade school year. MAP and AIMSweb MAZE tests were administered at the start (fall), middle (winter), and end (spring) of the school year. Some students moved during the study and others had data missing. MAP scores for all three data points were reported for 141 of the students. Complete AIMSweb MAZE data was reported for 157 of the students.

Bailey Middle School Research


What is ESSA Tier 4?

Tier 4 – Demonstrates a Rationale. An intervention that demonstrates a rationale should:

  • Have a clear and effective logic model or theory of action which explains how the intervention being implemented is likely to improve relevant outcomes.
  • Be supported by research in the field.
  • Have an effort underway by an SEA, LEA, or outside research organization to determine their effectiveness

The information above is referenced in the following website: https://www.cde.ca.gov/re/es/evidence.asp

ESSA Studies: Research and documentation from Reading Horizons that meets the standards outlined in ESSA for Tier 4:


 ELL Studies: Grades 7-12 Lionel Middle School, Chamberlain High School, Austen High School

Download 1-Page Summary: Lionel Middle School

Download 3-Page Report: Lionel Middle School

Download 1-Page Summary: Chamberlain High School

Download 3-Page Report: Chamberlain High School

Download 2-Page Summary: Austen High School

Download 4-Page Report: Austen High School

Austen High School: Summary of Findings

A higher percentage of students in a high school refugee program made gains on Word Recognition Assessment scores after receiving Reading Horizons instruction than did students in the program who did not receive Reading Horizons instruction.

Background

A program was established at Austen High School to meet the needs of students who had recently relocated to the area as refugees. The students, who are linguistically and culturally diverse, were separated into two classes for this study: one that received Reading Horizons instruction and one that didn’t.

One program aspect that presented a logistical challenge to gathering student outcome data was the varied length of student enrollment. Some students spent a whole year in the program, whereas others spent less than half a year. Two types of students were in the program for fewer months: (a) those who relocated to the city mid-school year, and (b) those who, at the mid-year assessment, demonstrated sufficient linguistic skills to transfer to more inclusive classrooms. Although the partial-year student group varied as described, both classrooms had a similar proportion of students from this sub-group: 45% of students receiving Reading Horizons instruction spent less than four months in the program as compared to 46% of students who did not receive Reading Horizons instruction.

Resources

Reading Horizons interactive software and a teacher trained in the Reading Horizons method.

Implementation

The refugee program included two classes. Students in one class received instruction in Reading Horizons.

NOTE: In the Word Recognition Assessment included in the Reading Horizons software, students read word lists of increasing difficulty and receive a score based on corresponding grade-level equivalents. Levels on the assessment range from 0.0 to 12.0. The assessment was administered three times: at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year. Students in the program for less than four months participated in two rather than three assessments: at the beginning and end of their time in the program. The assessment was given to students in both classes; however, only a sample of students in the class not receiving Reading Horizons instruction took part in the assessment (60 students who were tested received Reading Horizons instruction and 15 students who were tested did not receive Reading Horizons instruction).

Lionel Middle School: Summary of Findings

Linguistically diverse middle school students gained an average of 2.5 levels on the Word Recognition Assessment after six weeks of Reading Horizons instruction during a summer school program.

Background

A school district in the southern United States implemented a pilot program to track the effectiveness of Reading Horizons direct instruction and computer courseware. Fifteen middle school students participated in a six-week ELL program over the summer, during which they received Reading Horizons instruction. All participants were linguistically diverse and learning English.

Resources

Reading Horizons direct instruction, Reading Horizons interactive software, and a teacher trained in the Reading Horizons method.

Implementation

The Reading Horizons program was administered for one hour a day, four days a week, for six weeks.

Chamberlain High School: Summary of Findings

After receiving Reading Horizons instruction, every student in the study made at least one grade-level gain on the Word Recognition Assessment.

Background

A high school resource teacher implemented the Reading Horizons program with 32 students. Pre- and post-test scores for all of the students were gathered before and after the students had used the Reading Horizons interactive software.

Resources

Reading Horizons interactive software and a resource teacher trained in the Reading Horizons method.

Implementation

Thirty-two students participated in the study. Sixteen students were designated as linguistically diverse and learning English (Group 1), and 16 students were receiving special education services (Group 2).